THE IMPERATIVE OF LITTORAL STATES’ COOPERATION IN TACKLING THE SCOURGE OF SEA PIRACY IN THE GULF OF GUINEA: A CASE STUDY OF THE FIGHT AGAINST PIRACY IN THE MALACCA AND SINGAPORE STRAITS

Zino UGBOMA

Abstract


The importance of maritime security and safety can never be overemphasized especially when looked upon from the backdrop of the fact that a greater percentage of world commerce is carried out via maritime transport2. Yet, the maritime industry continues to record on an incremental level, cases of maritime mischief and depredation3. These cases of maritime crime, especially piracy have attracted international attention at different times to the Straits of Malacca and the Gulf of Guinea. While the cases of piracy in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore have been significantly reduced to an almost non-existent level as a result of the measures put in place by the littoral states in the region, the situation in the Gulf of Guinea grows from bad to worse4. This paper assessed the situations in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore and the Gulf of Guinea, made comparisons thereof and reviewed the legal mechanisms that have been put in place in the Straits of Malacca to see if such measures could be adapted and applied by littoral states- as a collective- or regional organisations in the Gulf of Guinea as a way of solving the challenges posed to international commerce by the threat of piracy in the region. In doing that, the paper looked at the geographical features and economic importance of the two water bodies and x-rayed the legal framework applied in the Malacca Straits. The paper made recommendations in relation to transplanting the model from Asia to Africa with the aim of putting an end to or reducing piracy in the Gulf of Guinea to the barest minimum.

Full Text:

PDF

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.